Category: Newsroom

Hitting the Right Notes on Final Day in Miami

 

A classically trained concert pianist, Afrodite Zegers (NED) is no stranger to the big stage. So when the pressure was at fever pitch in the final race of the 2017 World Series Cup Miami presented by Sunbrella, and the proverbial lights of a live worldwide webcast at its brightest, Zegers and teammate Annaloes van Veen displayed incredible poise to grab the Women’s 470 title.

The Dutch team entered the final race essentially tied with Sophie Weguelin and Eilidh McIntyre (GBR) for first in the overall standings. While there were other teams mathematically alive for each spot on the podium, when Zegers and van Veen rounded the first mark in the lead, with Weguelin and McIntyre close behind, the race for gold was distilled to a two-boat battle.

“It was a stressful race,” said van Veen. “On the first upwind we caught up quite some metres and then the downwind was OK. But on the second upwind we didn’t cover too well.”

The British pair made the pass halfway up the second upwind leg and first place in the regatta came down to the final run. Zegers and van Veen patiently waited for the opportunity to strike. Three quarters of the way through the leg, they final got close enough steal the wind of their British team, roll over the top, get around the final mark in first place and cruise down the final leg to the win.

“There were only a few options,” said Zegers of that final downwind leg. “I think we just did what we had to do, jibe when we had the opportunity and sail the boat in a way would give bad air to the British. I don’t think there was another opportunity.”

After the ultimate heartbreak of finishing fourth by a single point in Rio 2016, Zegers and van Veen were quite excited that their campaign for a medal in Tokyo 2020 is off to a great start.

“We made a lot of mistakes as it was our first regatta after the Games,” said Zegers. “But it was a very good week.”

The Finn Medal Race featured a similar who-beat-who battle, but this time for the silver medal as Jorge Zarif (BRA) had locked up a successful defense of his 2016 championship prior to the start. Ben Cornish (GBR) and Anders Pedersen (NOR) started the deciding race essentially tied for second place; battle that ensued had more twists and turns than the average regatta.

Cornish got the better of the pre-start with Pedersen being whistled for a foul. But the first beat went Pederson’s way as Cornish opted for a loose cover, got stuck in a bad lane and lost ground trying to clear his air. Cornish got back in touch on the first run only to see Pedersen regain control on the second beat. The race was eventually decided just moments before the final turning mark when Cornish, who had the speed edge downwind all day, was able to just break the overlap and force Pedersen to round behind him for the final reach to the finish and grab the silver medal. Finland’s Oskari Muhonen and Mikael Hyrylåinen went into the Medal Race in ninth and 10th respectively and were the first two sailors across the finish line in the Medal Race.

Zarif finished third in the race and was rightfully pleased with his week of sailing.

“Very tricky regatta, when [the wind] is from the shore here it is really hard,” said Zarif. “I’m happy that we won. It was a great week, I don’t have any bad things to say. [In the future maybe] I can try to sail a little bit more like I did here, trying to take less risks.”

Soon after Zarif successfully defended his title from the 2016 World Cup Series Miami, Stu McNay and David Hughes (USA) had an opportunity to do the same in the Men’s 470. They also entered the race as the lone U.S. hope for a regatta win.

Around the top mark it didn’t look good for the American team as the two teams with a shot at gold, Panagiotis Mantis and Pavlos Kagialis (GRE) and Tetsuya Isozaki and Akira Takayanagi (JPN) rounded third and first, respectively, while McNay and Hughes were seventh.

The first run was pivotal. McNay and Hughes moved to fourth, while Mantis and Kagialis fell all the way to ninth. The American team would lose a boat before the finish, but by staying in fifth and ahead of the Greek duo they assured themselves of first overall. Isozaki and Takayanagi led all the way around for the win, which was enough to move them into second overall.

Patience, said Hughes, was the key to success this week. “It was a type of regatta where you had to be mentally fit and keep ready to strike back when the opportunity presented itself,” he said. “If you tried to force an opportunity you’d be punished.”

A promising note for the future of the US Sailing Team was the performance of 2016 Youth Sailing World Champions Wiley Rogers and Jack Parkin, who finished third in the Medal Race and sixth overall in their second international regatta in the 470.

“I really look forward to [competing against] future generations of sailors,” said McNay, a three-time Olympian in the 470. “It’s a wonderful sport because you can compete for a long time. It’s great as Dave and I get older that there are some younger guys on the way.”

For Pavlos Kontides the plan for the Laser Medal Race was simple. By keeping Nick Thompson in fifth or lower, Kontides ensured himself of a silver medal. Jean Baptiste Bernaz (FRA) had locked up the gold medal position courtesy of the 39-point lead he built through the first 10 races of the regatta.

Thompson’s situation was a little more complex as three sailors were within striking distance of the bronze medal position. Off the line Thompson had the freedom he needed and rounded the first mark in third, but Kontides stayed close and made a pass right before the leeward mark.

“I thought that wind would come back right [on the first upwind] but then it went more left so he was able to gain a bit of an advantage on me,” said Kontides. “But downwind you can catch the pressure first. One good maneuver and I manage to pass him.”

Once he got the lead, Kontides placed a tight cover on the British athlete and sailed both of them to the back of the pack. In doing so, he took Thompson out of bronze medal position when Lorenzo Chiavarini (GBR) moved from eighth to fifth on the final downwind leg.

“I felt a little bit sorry for him that he lost the bronze, but this is the sport of sailing,” said Kontides. “We are enemies on the water, but friends back on the shore.”

Italy’s Giovanni Coccoluto won the race and moved from 10th to eighth in the overall standings. Bernaz, sailing what amounted to a victory lap, finished second.

Vasileia Karachaliou (GRE) and Evi Van Acker (BEL) went into the Laser Radial Medal Race in first and second, respectively, and that’s how they crossed the finish line. Karachaliou needed to finish eighth or better to lock up gold, while Van Acker held a similar advantage over third, as she needed to finish ninth or better to ensure silver.

Nonetheless, Karachaliou approached the race with the same goal as the first 10, only one of which she finished outside the top five. She started near the pin, played the first beat to perfection and, despite the instability of the breeze, never dropped lower than second. Van Acker’s second was a little more challenging as she rounded the first mark in fifth and had to work through the fleet to second. Mathilde de Karangat (FRA) finished fifth in the Medal Race and third in the regatta.

“I can’t describe how I’m feeling now,” said an elated Karachaliou. “I’m really happy. Being calm and focused always helps a lot. If you’re stressed you can make easy mistakes, sail away from the fleet. After the start I went away from the fleet [on the left side] and I saw the right shift and I tacked and I came back again to the fleet and it was OK.”

Karachaliou, just 20 years old and with no previous top-10 finishes in a World Cup-level regatta, was something of an unknown heading into Miami. But she has clearly made a significant leap in her ability and caught the eye of the Laser Radial establishment.

“She had a really good week, all respect to her,” said Van Acker, the London 2012 bronze medalist in the class. “She really was the best this week. I’m happy to be back racing, and happy to win the silver medal here. It was all about consistency and [Karachaliou] was the most consistent girl this week.”

All photos: © Sailing Energy

RESULTS / ENTRIES
A full list of sailors registered to sail in Miami is available to view here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/entries?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa
Results will be available from Tuesday 24 January via the Manage2Sail results centre here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/results?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa

TRACKING
Live tracking and competitor’s analytics will be available via SAP Sailing Analytics throughout the event here – https://swc2017-miami.sapsailing.com/gwt/Home.html#/event/:eventId=b82f9012-47d8-4e9e-b3b2-a690c1db0fe3

PRESS RELEASES
World Sailing will be releasing international press releases after racing throughout the duration of World Cup Miami. All the latest news and reports will be available to read here – http://www.sailing.org/worldcup/news/index.php

TELEVISION
Medal Races on Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 January will be streamed live on World Sailing’s Facebook and YouTube Channel.

SOCIAL MEDIA
Follow the event on World Sailing’s social networks and get involved in the conversation using #SWCMiami17
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/SailingWCMiami/
Instagram – https://instagram.com/isafworldsailing/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/SailingWCMiami or https://twitter.com/worldsailing
Snapchat – Follow our Story on Snapchat, search for worldsailing

Morning Briefing: Day 6

The World Cup Series Miami will come to a close on day six with the final five Medal Races LIVE from Regatta Park, Coconut Grove.

Following the previous day’s Medal Races where the first 2017 World Cup Series medals were confirmed, it is now the turn of the 470s, Lasers and Finn to complete their podium line ups ahead of the closing ceremony from Coral Reef Yacht Club.

Racing will be LIVE from Biscayne Bay on World Sailing’s YouTube channel – www.youtube.com/worldsailingtv

The final day’s racing, which begins at 12:05 local time, will see wind coming in from the north at around 12 knots and gusting up to 16 for the medal hopefuls. In a change from the usual Miami sunshine, Coconut Grove has had some light rain in the morning with the temperatures dropping to the mid-teens for onshore spectators watching on the big screen.

Class # of Races Start time Racing Area
Laser 1 12:05 Medal
Laser Radial 1 12:50 Medal
Finn 1 13:35 Medal
470 Men 1 14:20 Medal
470 Women 1 15:05 Medal

Information on how to follow the event is below:

RESULTS / ENTRIES
A full list of sailors registered to sail in Miami is available to view here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/entries?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa
Results will be available from Tuesday 24 January via the Manage2Sail results centre here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/results?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa

TRACKING
Live tracking and competitor’s analytics will be available via SAP Sailing Analytics throughout the event here – https://swc2017-miami.sapsailing.com/gwt/Home.html#/event/:eventId=b82f9012-47d8-4e9e-b3b2-a690c1db0fe3

PRESS RELEASES
World Sailing will be releasing international press releases after racing throughout the duration of World Cup Miami. All the latest news and reports will be available to read here – http://www.sailing.org/worldcup/news/index.php

TELEVISION
Medal Races on Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 January will be streamed live on World Sailing’s Facebook and YouTube Channel.

SOCIAL MEDIA
Follow the event on World Sailing’s social networks and get involved in the conversation using #SWCMiami17
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/SailingWCMiami/
Instagram – https://instagram.com/isafworldsailing/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/SailingWCMiami or https://twitter.com/worldsailing
Snapchat – Follow our Story on Snapchat, search for worldsailing

WORLD CUP SERIES
World Sailing’s World Cup Series is an annual series of Olympic sailing for elite and professional sailors. Over 2,000 of the world’s leading sailors, representing over 75 nations have competed in the World Cup Series which offers a definitive guide to the best-of-the-best in the Olympic sailing world.

Shifty Conditions Make Medal Races a Test of Nerve

Yunxiu Lu showed impressive downwind speed during the Women’s RS:X Medal Race, twice making up significant ground on the downwind legs to preserve her overall lead and take the regatta win. A very pleased and humble Lu chalked the win up to a bit of luck, perhaps brought on by the Chinese New Year.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Veteran Spanish windsurfer Marina Alabau Neira won the race, keeping her in second place in the regatta.

“It was tricky,” Alabau said of the Medal Race wind conditions. “All the Chinese girls were pushing hard, pumping a lot. It was really hard to win the race. [This regatta] was really nice for me as it was super good training. It was one of my worst conditions; shifty, offshore winds. So I’m pretty happy [with silver].”

The big shift came in the battle for bronze. Three sailors started the race within four points of the final spot on the podium. Jiao Ma (CHN) seemingly put herself out of contention when she was called OCS. But she charged back to third place in the race only to fall just one point short of bronze when Manjia Zheng (CHN) finished fourth. Isobel Hamilton (GBR) who started the race in third place, finished sixth in the Medal Race and dropped to fifth overall.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

With a 37-point lead, France’s Louis Giard could’ve coasted through the Men’s RS:X Medal Race, finished last and still taken home the Miami title by at least 19 points. Instead however, he attacked it like he had the 12 previous races, charging from eighth at the first mark to first at the third mark before finishing third in the race.

Countryman Pierre Le Coq, the bronze medalist from Rio 2016, needed a similar comeback to hold second place in the regatta. He rounded the first mark in ninth and finished fourth in the race, edging Mateo Sanz Lanz (SUI) by three points for second in the regatta.

Dutch sailor Kiran Badloe charged off the starting line in the Men’s RS:X Medal Race like he had something to prove. After a stunning start to the regatta—five straight top-three finishes—Badloe struggled down the stretch and dropped to fifth place, eight points off the podium. The Medal Race followed a similar pattern. He led at the first and second marks, but then things fell apart on the second beat.

“I misread the wind a bit and threw a bit of horsepower down on the first lap and that went well,” said Badloe, who came into the regatta a little under the weather and struggled with his conditioning in the lighter winds when the RS:X requires maximum effort, “but then I was just running out of breath and making mistakes and that sends you to the back pretty quick.”

Mattia Camboni (ITA) won the Medal Race with a strong performance on the final two legs and went from sixth to fourth in the overall standings.

@Marina Garcia / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

With the regatta championship secure going into the Medal Race, 49er sailors Dylan Fletcher-Scott and Stuart Bithell (GBR) sailed a clean race and largely stayed out of the fray. They finished fifth, capping off an impressive start to the Tokyo 2020 quad for this new team.

“It feels like we’ve gelled pretty well,” said Bithell, who won a silver medal at London 2012 in the 470. “There’s still plenty of work to do, but it’s nice to be on top of the podium.”

The battle for second was more interesting. It was nip and tuck all the way through the Medal Race for Austria’s Benjamin Bildstein and David Hussl. And no point of the race was more anxious than just before the second windward mark, when Bildstein and Hussl tacked just in front of a pack of boats, one of whom thought the Austrian team might’ve broken the rules. But the judges waved off the protest and Bildstein and Hussl held fourth place to the finish to claim the silver.

“The plan was to get top three in the Medal Race and that way we can stay on the podium,” said Hussl. “At one point [during the Medal Race] we were quite close to losing it, but at the end of the second upwind we [got in front of] some boats and it was like ‘OK, we are safe here.’”

Carl Sylvan and Marcus Anjemark (SWE) started the race in third, but when they slipped to last late in the race, the door opened for the Spanish crew of Diego Botin and Iago Lòpez Marra to seize bronze, which is what they did by finishing seventh.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Rio 2016 gold medalists Martine Soffiati Grael and Kahena Kunze had a 17-point lead heading into the Medal Race, which meant that anything but last place would guarantee them the regatta win. They didn’t take any chances and steadily worked through the fleet after a conservative start to win the Medal Race and the regatta.

“Our main goal was to have a free start and sail every puff and shift,” said a happy Kunze. “The first upwind was not good but we managed to come back and catch the Norwegians.”

The race for second and third was decided at two distinct points. Being over the starting line early effectively eliminated Helene Naess and Marie Ronningen (NOR), who started the day three points out of third, from podium contention. A few minutes later, fellow Norwegians Ragna and Maia Agerup, who started the day with a five-point lead, stamped their claim on silver by taking the lead at the top mark.

While the Agerup twins ran into some rough water on the final run and finished third, that was still good enough to secure second place in the regatta. Victoria Travascio and Maria Branz (ARG) finished sixth in the Medal Race and third overall.

It was a British clean sweep in the Nacra 17 Medal Race, with John Gimson and Anna Burnet taking the win, Ben Saxton and Nicola Groves in second and Tom Phipps and Nicola Boniface in third.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Saxton and Groves, who started the race with a nine-point lead over Phipps and Boniface, didn’t appear interested in leaving anything to chance as they executed a text-book pin-end start and raced off toward the left side of the course with Gimson and Burnet close behind.

With the way the breeze was shifting around, it would seem to be a risk to bet so definitively on one side of the course. But Saxton and Groves, who were sailing their first event since the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, had been next to flawless the second half of the regatta in similar conditions so there was every reason to think they’d made the correct choice.

By the windward mark it was apparent they had. Saxton and Groves rounded first followed closely by Gimson and Burnet. Those two teams would swap positions at the second windward mark, but that wouldn’t impact the overall standings. In fact, the podium didn’t change at all after the Medal Race with Phipps and Boniface taking silver and Nico Delle-Karth and Lauro Schöfegger (AUT) finishing seventh in the race and third overall.

“I think if you look at the beginning [of the regatta] that definitely shows a bit of rust,” said Groves. “Then we kind of remembered how to do it and got back in to our routines as the week went on and our results showed that.”

Jean Baptiste Bernaz (FRA) won’t get his first-place medal until tomorrow. But he can cerebrate tonight. He has a 39-point lead over second place in the 59-boat Laser fleet. Pavlos Kontides (CYP) has guaranteed himself a medal of some color. He has a 12-point lead over Nick Thompson (GBR) who will defend the final spot on the podium against Lorenzo Chiavarini (GBR) and Phillipp Buhl (GER).

Baring some dramatic results, the Laser Radial podium is set. Vasileia Karachaliou (GRE) has a 16-point lead over Evi Van Acker (BEL) in second who in turn is 17 points ahead of Mathilde de Kerangat (FRA). With fourth place 36 points further back there is no chance of anyone else breaking into the top three.

First place in the Finn is secure for Jorge Zarif (BRA), provided he finishes the race. He has a 20-point lead over Ben Cornish (GBR). However, Cornish will need to stay ahead of Anders Pedersen (NOR) to keep silver. With just two points separating those two sailors—and the double-points Medal Race counting as the tie-breaker—it’s a who-beats-who battle for second place. Alican Kaynar (TUR) and Luke Muller (USA) both have outside chances at the podium.

Stu McNay and David Hughes (USA) are assured of a medal and have an eight-point lead over second in the Men’s 470 class. Panagiotis Mantis and Pavlos Kagialis (GRE) are second with Tetsuya Isozaki and Akira Takayanagi (JPN) in third. Fourth through seventh remain in medal contention.

The Women’s 470 standings have four teams with a shot at first place. Afrodite Zeger and Annaleos van Veen (NED) are effectively tied with Sophie Weguelin and Eilidh McIntyre (GBR) for the overall lead while Silvia Mas Depares and Paula Barcelo Martin (ESP) can claim the championship by placing one boat between themselves and the British team and two boats between themselves and the Dutch team. A second Spanish team, Bàrbara Cornudella Ravetllat and Sara López Ravetllat, also have a shot at each spot on the podium.

The final five Medal Races for the 2017 World Cup Series will be broadcast live via World Sailing’s YouTube channel starting at noon (EST) Sunday, and will be shown on a Jumbotron screen at Regatta Park in Coconut Grove. Admission to the park is free and food trucks will be on hand to ensure sailing fans don’t go hungry.

RESULTS / ENTRIES
A full list of sailors registered to sail in Miami is available to view here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/entries?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa
Results will be available from Tuesday 24 January via the Manage2Sail results centre here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/results?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa

TRACKING
Live tracking and competitor’s analytics will be available via SAP Sailing Analytics throughout the event here – https://swc2017-miami.sapsailing.com/gwt/Home.html#/event/:eventId=b82f9012-47d8-4e9e-b3b2-a690c1db0fe3

PRESS RELEASES
World Sailing will be releasing international press releases after racing throughout the duration of World Cup Miami. All the latest news and reports will be available to read here – http://www.sailing.org/worldcup/news/index.php

TELEVISION
Medal Races on Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 January will be streamed live on World Sailing’s Facebook and YouTube Channel.

SOCIAL MEDIA
Follow the event on World Sailing’s social networks and get involved in the conversation using #SWCMiami17
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/SailingWCMiami/
Instagram – https://instagram.com/isafworldsailing/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/SailingWCMiami or https://twitter.com/worldsailing
Snapchat – Follow our Story on Snapchat, search for worldsailing

Morning Briefing: Day 5

Day five of the World Cup Series Miami brings the first of two LIVE Medal Race days from Regatta Park, Coconut Grove. First up are the 49ers, Nacra17 and RS:X who will race of Biscayne Bay for the first gold medals of the 2017 World Cup Series and you can watch online on World Sailing’s YouTube channel – www.youtube.com/worldsailingtv

Elsewhere the 470s, Lasers and Finn sailors continue with their opening series as they aim for the top ten and the chance to race in Sunday’s LIVE Medal Race finales.

All sailors will be greeted with a 10-12 knot breeze from the north which turns towards the east later in the afternoon. Onshore, spectators and families watching the action on the big screen at Regatta Park will again be sitting in warm Miami sunshine making the most of the free entry to the Park and food available.

Class # of Races Start time Racing Area
RS:X Men 1 14:45 Medal
RS:X Women 1 14:05 Medal
Laser 2 11:00 Charlie
Laser Radial 2 13:30 Charlie
Finn 2 14:00 Delta
49er 3 12:05 Medal
49erFX 3 12:45 Medal
470 Men 3 10:30 Delta
470 Women 3 10:40 Delta
Nacra 17 1 13:25 Medal

Information on how to follow the event is below:

RESULTS / ENTRIES
A full list of sailors registered to sail in Miami is available to view here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/entries?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa
Results will be available from Tuesday 24 January via the Manage2Sail results centre here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/results?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa

TRACKING
Live tracking and competitor’s analytics will be available via SAP Sailing Analytics throughout the event here – https://swc2017-miami.sapsailing.com/gwt/Home.html#/event/:eventId=b82f9012-47d8-4e9e-b3b2-a690c1db0fe3

PRESS RELEASES
World Sailing will be releasing international press releases after racing throughout the duration of World Cup Miami. All the latest news and reports will be available to read here – http://www.sailing.org/worldcup/news/index.php

TELEVISION
Medal Races on Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 January will be streamed live on World Sailing’s Facebook and YouTube Channel.

SOCIAL MEDIA
Follow the event on World Sailing’s social networks and get involved in the conversation using #SWCMiami17
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/ISAFWorldSailing
Instagram – https://instagram.com/isafworldsailing/
Twitter – @worldsailing
Snapchat – Follow our Story on Snapchat, search for worldsailing

WORLD CUP SERIES
World Sailing’s World Cup Series is an annual series of Olympic sailing for elite and professional sailors. Over 2,000 of the world’s leading sailors, representing over 75 nations have competed in the World Cup Series which offers a definitive guide to the best-of-the-best in the Olympic sailing world.

Grael and Kunze Display Their Mettle on Day 4

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

For Martine Soffiati Grael and Kahena Kunze, the fourth day of the 2017 World Cup Series Miami presented by Sunbrella started on a sour note, with a 14th in a 16-boat 49erFX fleet.

“It was crazy,” said Kunze when asked about the wind in the first race. “It was going to the left and to the right, changing all the time.”

But even that result wasn’t enough to dampen either the spirits of the resilient Brazilian duo or their chances of winning the 49erFX division in this regatta for the first time since 2013, when the class was so new that just nine teams competed.

A slight change of venue and the filling of a southeasterly sea breeze before the second race were welcome changes for Grael and Kunze. They finished fourth and second in the day’s final two races. Tomorrow they will start the Medal Race with a nearly insurmountable 17-point lead over second place.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

A live broadcast of the Medal Races starts at noon on World Sailing’s YouTube Channel (youtube.com/worldsailingtv) and on the Jumbotron screen at Regatta Park in Coconut Grove, Fla.

The only way that the second place team in the 49erFX, Ragna and Maia Agerup of Norway, could take over the lead in tomorrow’s double-points Medal Race would be if Grael and Kunze finished last and the Norwegian pair finished first.

The most interesting battle during the Medal Race is likely to be for the lesser podium places. Victoria Travascio and Maria Branz (ARG) are in third, just five points behind second with another Norwegian pair, Helen Naess and Marie Ronningen, three points further back in fourth.

Travascio and Branz had their best day of the regatta to move into contention. They finished seventh in the first race and won the next two.

“The racecourse was really [strong] on the left, so it was crucial to have a good start and have a good lane to go to the left,” said Branz of the second and third races.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Like his countrywomen, Brazilian Finn sailor Jorge Zarif struggled in the first race of the day. “It was really hard because we had a very light breeze,” said Zarif, who won this regatta last year and then experienced the heartbreak of a fourth in his home-country Rio 2016 Olympics. “The wind was shifting a lot, a lot of differences in pressure. I had a good start and I didn’t find a good gap. I tried the left of the racecourse and it didn’t work and it was really hard to pass someone in the downwind. I have a yellow flag [for a kinetics violation] and if I get a second I have to retire from the race, so I was really calm trying to not get a second yellow flag.”

But he, too, was able to rebound, recording his fifth win in eight races in the day’s second contest and building a 12-point lead over Ben Cornish (GBR), who sits second. The Finns, along with the 470s, Lasers and Radials, will continue full-fleet racing tomorrow and have their Medal Races on Sunday.

The Nacra 17 fleet made the most of an early breeze and cranked through four races to complete its opening series. Ben Saxton and Nicola Groves (GBR) left no doubt who is the class of this fleet recording three firsts and a second. They start tomorrow’s Medal Race with a nine-point lead over Tom Phipps and Nicola Boniface (GBR). Nico Delle-Karth and Laura Schöfegger (AUT) are third, eight points further back. The Italian team of Lorenzo Bressani and Caterina Marianna Banti are fourth and in contention for bronze, though it will take a lot of help. Riley Gibbs and Louise Chafee (USA) and John Gimson and Anna Burnet (GBR) are tied on points for fifth, but out of medal contention, provided the Austrian team finishes the race.

Consistency was a struggle across the 51-boat Laser Radial fleet. Just one sailor, Mathilde de Karangat (FRA) strung together two top-10 finishes. She is now just four points out of second, currently held by Evi Van Acker, of Belgium. Vasileia Karachaliou (GRE) had a fifth and a 14th today and, with 23 points through 8 races, holds a 16-point lead over Van Acker.

Dylan Fletcher-Scott and Stuart Bithell’s lead in the 49er took a significant hit in the last two races today, a 16th and 20th. But nonetheless, their 21-point margin over second means the British pair will start tomorrow’s Medal Race guaranteed a regatta win. The battle for silver and bronze comes down to Carl Sylvan and Marcus Anjemark (SWE), with 71 points, Benjamin Bildstein and David Hussl (AUT), with 72 points and Diego Botin le Chever and Iago Lòpez Marra (ESP), with 77 points. Yago and Klaus Lange (ARG) and Lucas Rual and Emile Amoros (FRA) have outside chances at a medal.

Jean Baptiste Bernaz’s streak of race wins in the Laser came to an end earlier today. He finished sixth and 17th in the two races. But with everyone else in the top 10 struggling mightily, the French sailor’s lead is now 32 points over Pavlos Kontides (CYP) in second.

Louis Giard of France, closed the full-fleet portion of the Men’s RS:X regatta with a remarkable run of five straight top-two finishes. His reward is an unassailable 33-point lead over Kiran Badloe (NED) in second heading into tomorrow’s Medal Race. Badloe, with 66 points, will go into the Medal Race looking to defend his silver position against Pierre Le Coq (FRA) and Mateo Sanz Lanz (SUI), who are one and eight points back respectively.

With a fifth, first and second today Marina Alabau Neira (ESP) did everything she could to put herself into position to challenge for first place in tomorrow’s Women’s RS:X Medal Race. She’ll need to make up 14 points to take the gold from Yunxiu Lu (CHN). Isobel Hamilton (GBR), Manjia Zheng (CHN) and Jiao Ma (CHN) are separated by just four points in what is likely to be the battle for bronze.

The 470s fell victim to the dying breeze, getting just one race in very light conditions. In the Women’s 470, a win by Afrodite Zegers and Anneloes van Veen (NED) pushed them into the overall lead with Sophie Weguelin and Eilidh McIntyre (GBR) in second, three points back.

@Pedro Martinez / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Stu McNay and David Hughes’ steady march to the top of the Men’s 470 standings peaked today as a fifth place in a very light-air race lifted the American team into first place. With 25 points, they are four points ahead of Panagiotis Mantis and Pavlos Kagialis (GRE) and nine points clear of Tetsuya Isozaki and Akira Takayanagi (JPN).

Racing continues tomorrow starting at 10:30 am on Biscayne Bay. The Medal Races for the 2017 World Cup Series, which start at noon, will be broadcast live via World Sailing’s YouTube channel starting at noon (EST) on Saturday and Sunday, and will be shown on a Jumbotron screen at Regatta Park in Coconut Grove. Admission to the park is free and food trucks will be on hand to ensure sailing fans don’t go hungry.

RESULTS / ENTRIES
A full list of sailors registered to sail in Miami is available to view here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/entries?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa
Results will be available from Tuesday 24 January via the Manage2Sail results centre here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/results?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa

TRACKING
Live tracking and competitor’s analytics will be available via SAP Sailing Analytics throughout the event here – https://swc2017-miami.sapsailing.com/gwt/Home.html#/event/:eventId=b82f9012-47d8-4e9e-b3b2-a690c1db0fe3

PRESS RELEASES
World Sailing will be releasing international press releases after racing throughout the duration of World Cup Miami. All the latest news and reports will be available to read here – http://www.sailing.org/worldcup/news/index.php

TELEVISION
Medal Races on Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 January will be streamed live on World Sailing’s Facebook and YouTube Channel.

SOCIAL MEDIA
Follow the event on World Sailing’s social networks and get involved in the conversation using #SWCMiami17
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/SailingWCMiami/
Instagram – https://instagram.com/isafworldsailing/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/SailingWCMiami or https://twitter.com/worldsailing
Snapchat – Follow our Story on Snapchat, search for worldsailing

 

Morning Briefing: Day 4

Day four of the World Cup Series Miami will see the Medal Race places decided in the skiff, multihull and windsurfing classes as their opening series draws to a close. There are places at stake in Saturday’s live Medal Races out of Regatta Park, Coconut Grove for the 49ers, Nacra 17 and RS:X sailors while the Finns, 470 and Lasers continue to fight it out for their chance of Medal Race action on Sunday.

There is a west, south-westerly wind forecast which looks to be holding steady at around 8 knots for the sailors to contend with. The winds will be gusting up to around the 10 knot mark as Miami, Florida continues to provide plenty of sunshine for the visiting sailors and spectators to Regatta Park.

Class # of Races Start time Racing Area
RS:X Men 3 13:40 Bravo
RS:X Women 3 13:30 Bravo
Laser 2 12:40 Charlie
Laser Radial 2 12:30 Charlie
Finn 2 11:30 Delta
49er 3 13:30 Alpha
49erFX 3 11:00 Alpha
470 Men 2 14:10 Delta
470 Women 2 14:00 Delta
Nacra 17 4 11:00 Bravo

Information on how to follow the event is below:

RESULTS / ENTRIES
A full list of sailors registered to sail in Miami is available to view here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/entries?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa
Results will be available from Tuesday 24 January via the Manage2Sail results centre here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/results?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa

TRACKING
Live tracking and competitor’s analytics will be available via SAP Sailing Analytics throughout the event here – https://swc2017-miami.sapsailing.com/gwt/Home.html#/event/:eventId=b82f9012-47d8-4e9e-b3b2-a690c1db0fe3

PRESS RELEASES
World Sailing will be releasing international press releases after racing throughout the duration of World Cup Miami. All the latest news and reports will be available to read here – http://www.sailing.org/worldcup/news/index.php

TELEVISION
Medal Races on Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 January will be streamed live on World Sailing’s Facebook and YouTube Channel.

SOCIAL MEDIA
Follow the event on World Sailing’s social networks and get involved in the conversation using #SWCMiami17
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/SailingWCMiami/
Instagram – https://instagram.com/isafworldsailing/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/SailingWCMiami or https://twitter.com/worldsailing
Snapchat – Follow our Story on Snapchat, search for worldsailing

WORLD CUP SERIES
World Sailing’s World Cup Series is an annual series of Olympic sailing for elite and professional sailors. Over 2,000 of the world’s leading sailors, representing over 75 nations have competed in the World Cup Series which offers a definitive guide to the best-of-the-best in the Olympic sailing world.

Minimizing Risk Is Key to Success on ‘Crazy’ Biscayne Bay

 

For Swiss RS:X sailor Mateo Sanz Lanz, success on the third day of racing at the 2017 World Series Cup Miami presented by Sunbrella was as much about what he didn’t do as what he did do. In a gusty and shifty northeasterly breeze that moved about like an over-caffeinated flyweight boxer, Lanz finished first, third and fourth in three races.

@Pedro Martinez / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

“Today was really shifty and gusty and during the races there were many changes of positions; it was crazy,” said Lanz, who finished 14th at the Rio 2016 Olympics. “I didn’t know really well what to do, [I tried to] just manage my position with the fleet, be conservative, and not take many risks. You could pass the upwind mark really good then round the downwind mark with 10 people coming from behind with strong gusts and planing.”

Lanz had a forgettable second day of the regatta, with a 15th, 17th and a U-flag disqualification for being over the starting line early. His complete turnaround, from a results perspective, was all the more impressive when considering that only one other sailor in the top 10 was able to string together three top-10 finishes.

How tough was it on the water? The regatta leader going into racing, Kiran Badloe (NED), finished 11, 15, 26 in today’s races after not finishing worse than third in the first six races.

Taking maximum advantage of Badloe’s struggles was Louis Giard of France, who finished sixth, first and second. Giard now has a 12-point lead over Badloe in second place with three races, and the Medal Race, remaining.

Giard’s keys to success in this atypically unstable wind sounds fairly similar to that of Lanz.

“I didn’t try for some crazy perfect start, but then I followed the wind pretty well and did not try any crazy stuff, just doing what I do the best,” said Giard, who has his eyes on the French berth in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, though getting that will mean fending off Rio 2016 bronze medalist Pierre Le Coq, who sits fourth in this regatta. “The wind was really shifty and sometimes you can have around 12 knots and the other guy can have only 4 knots, so you have to manage your race all the time to be in the right gust and the right shift. It’s not an easy game, but I play it well today.”

For sailors who found themselves occasionally out of sync with the breeze, it was all about damage control.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

British RS:X sailor Isobel Hamilton fought hard all day just to stay in the top 10 in each race. A 4, 10, 9 was well off the 3, 2, 1 she produced on the second day of racing. But considering how much worse it could’ve been, she wasn’t complaining.

“We kind of decided that getting an average in the top five or top six would be a good day because it was pretty unpredictable,” said Hamilton. “I almost did that, so I’m pretty happy.

“The secret to success [on days like this] is keeping a level head. Just because you’ve lost a bit of distance on the upwind doesn’t mean you can’t instantly gain it on a downwind with a gust. Just keep your head and always try to take places.”

With nine of 12 races done before the top 10 are moved into the Medal Race, Hamilton has put herself in a good position to claim a podium spot in the first major competition on the road to the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

Yunxiu Lu, of China, leads the Women’s RS:X with 24 points, with countrywoman Manjia Chen in second with 38. Hamilton has 44 and Marina Alabau Neira (ESP) is just off the podium with 46.

The 49ers got back on schedule with four races, three of which were won by the British duo of Dylan Fletcher-Scott and Stuart Bithell. With a third in the fourth race, they now have a very cozy 27-point lead over second, Carl Sylvan and Marcus Angemark of Sweden. Benjamin Bildstein and David Hussl (AUT) are third, 13 points further back.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Martine Soffiatti Grael and Kahena Kunze (BRA) are showing no signs of slowing down after winning gold in 49erFX at the Rio 2016 Olympics. They totaled 11 points in four races today and lead a pair of Norwegian teams—Helen Naess and Marie Ronningen and Ragna and Maia Agerup—by 18 points.

With a pair of wins, Jean Baptiste Bernaz (FRA) pushed his winning streak to three races and his lead in the Laser to seven points over Pavlos Kontides of Cyprus. Great Britain’s Nick Thompson is third. Charlie Buckingham of the United States is fourth, but just 10 points separate his current position from 10th.

The race for gold in the Laser Radial appears to be a two-women competition. Vasileia Karachaliou (GRE) leads the class with 13 points while Evi Van Acker (BEL) is second with 14. Mathilde de Karangat (FRA) is third with 37.

Stu McNay and David Hughes (USA) vaulted onto the podium in the Men’s 470 with a third and a first. With 20 points, the defending regatta champions are just two points behind Panagiotis Mantis and Pavlos Kagialis of Greece. Tetsuya Isozaki and Akira Takayanagi (JPN) are third with 23 points.

Consistency has been the name of the game for Women’s 470 sailors Sophie Weguelin and Eilidh McIntyre (GBR). They have finished second in five of six races and, with 10 points, are in first, one point ahead of Afrodite Zegers and Anneloes van Veen of the Netherlands. Silva Mas Depares and Paula Barcelo Martin (ESP) are third.

The British are dominating the Nacra 17 class, with Tom Phipps and Nicola Boniface (GBR) in first with 28 points and Ben Saxton and Nicola Groves (GBR) in second with 30 points. Nico Delle-Karth and Laura Schöfegger (AUT) are third with 34 points.

Jorge Zarif continued his winning ways in the Finn, claiming both of today’s races to open up a six-point lead over Ben Cornish (GBR), who stands on 12 points. Anders Pedersen (NOR) is third with 15 points.

Racing continues tomorrow from Coconut Grove at 11 a.m. The Medal Races will be held on Saturday and Sunday starting at noon.

RESULTS / ENTRIES
A full list of sailors registered to sail in Miami is available to view here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/entries?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa
Results will be available from Tuesday 24 January via the Manage2Sail results centre here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/results?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa

TRACKING
Live tracking and competitor’s analytics will be available via SAP Sailing Analytics throughout the event here – https://swc2017-miami.sapsailing.com/gwt/Home.html#/event/:eventId=b82f9012-47d8-4e9e-b3b2-a690c1db0fe3

PRESS RELEASES
World Sailing will be releasing international press releases after racing throughout the duration of World Cup Miami. All the latest news and reports will be available to read here – http://www.sailing.org/worldcup/news/index.php

TELEVISION
Medal Races on Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 January will be streamed live on World Sailing’s Facebook and YouTube Channel.

SOCIAL MEDIA
Follow the event on World Sailing’s social networks and get involved in the conversation using #SWCMiami17
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/SailingWCMiami/
Instagram – https://instagram.com/isafworldsailing/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/SailingWCMiami or https://twitter.com/worldsailing
Snapchat – Follow our Story on Snapchat, search for worldsailing

Morning Briefing: Day 3

Day three looks to offer a steady breeze throughout the day on the waters of Biscayne Bay for the 400 competitors from 44 nations at the World Cup Series Miami.

Regatta Park, Coconut Grove is again bathed in sunshine on Thursday 26 January for the visiting sailors and a south, south-westerly breeze hovering around 10-12 knots is forecast which will gust up to 14 as the hunt continues for the first World Cup medals of 2017.

Class # of Races Start time Racing Area
RS:X Men 3 11:00 Bravo
RS:X Women 3 11:10 Bravo
Laser 2 12:30 Charlie
Laser Radial 2 12:40 Charlie
Finn 2 14:00 Delta
49er 3 11:00 Alpha
49erFX 4 13:30 Alpha
470 Men 2 11:30 Delta
470 Women 2 11:40 Delta
Nacra 17 4 13:30 Bravo

Information on how to follow the event is below:

RESULTS / ENTRIES
A full list of sailors registered to sail in Miami is available to view here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/entries?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa
Results will be available from Tuesday 24 January via the Manage2Sail results centre here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/results?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa

TRACKING
Live tracking and competitor’s analytics will be available via SAP Sailing Analytics throughout the event here – https://swc2017-miami.sapsailing.com/gwt/Home.html#/event/:eventId=b82f9012-47d8-4e9e-b3b2-a690c1db0fe3

PRESS RELEASES
World Sailing will be releasing international press releases after racing throughout the duration of World Cup Miami. All the latest news and reports will be available to read here – http://www.sailing.org/worldcup/news/index.php

TELEVISION
Medal Races on Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 January will be streamed live on World Sailing’s Facebook and YouTube Channel.

SOCIAL MEDIA
Follow the event on World Sailing’s social networks and get involved in the conversation using #SWCMiami17
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/SailingWCMiami/
Instagram – https://instagram.com/isafworldsailing/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/SailingWCMiami or https://twitter.com/worldsailing
Snapchat – Follow our Story on Snapchat, search for worldsailing

WORLD CUP SERIES
World Sailing’s World Cup Series is an annual series of Olympic sailing for elite and professional sailors. Over 2,000 of the world’s leading sailors, representing over 75 nations have competed in the World Cup Series which offers a definitive guide to the best-of-the-best in the Olympic sailing world.

Knocking Off the Rust on the Day 2

Even sailors who have committed in advance to another campaign traditionally take some time away from the sport after the Olympics. The question is usually how much time is needed to refresh the batteries without getting too stale. Decades ago these hiatuses were measured in years. Now it’s more likely to be weeks or months.

The British duo of Ben Saxton and Nicola Groves finished ninth at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in the doublehanded Nacra 17 catamaran and then took the rest of the year off. They got back into the boat for the first time a few weeks ago and officially started their campaign for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at the 2017 World Series Cup Miami presented by Sunbrella.

The first day of racing had more than its share of bumps in the road, including two double-digit finishes and a race they were forced to retire from after sailing the wrong course.

Day 2 was a different story.

“We sailed well, we’ve got to be happy with a third and a first when we haven’t been in the boat for about five months since the Games,” said Saxton. “We feel a bit rusty compared to the guys that have been training though the autumn. Some of these guys are a little bit slicker than us. I think it’ll set us up well to be here. I can understand why other people aren’t here. But I’m happy to be here. I love racing and I love sailing so why wouldn’t you be in Miami racing.”

The four-point day was the best among the 17-boat fleet and moved them right into contention for the overall lead. They are currently fourth, six points behind Lorenzo Bressani and Caterina Marianna Banti (ITA) and Tom Phipps and Nicola Boniface (GBR) who are tied on points for first.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Nico Delle-Karth and Laura Schöfegger (AUT) are in third. Both are experienced skiff sailors—Delle-Karth finished fourth in the 2012 London Olympic Games in the 49er class and has competed in three other Games—but are new to each other and the speedy catamaran. They finished today with a second and a fourth.

“I am really surprised by our performance today,” said Delle-Karth. “Laura did an excellent job and considering it was our 12th [day] together and on the Nacra, we are more than happy.”

The top American team of Riley Gibbs and 2016 Rio Olympian Louisa Chafee also had a solid day. A fourth and a sixth was good enough to move them into seventh place, with 25 points.

“Today was definitely a pretty good day,” said Gibbs. “We’ve only been in the boat for nine days together, though we have some other things going for us. It’s awesome to sail with Louisa, who went to Rio 2016, and does a great job with the boat handling. And even though it’s my first Nacra 17 event, the tactics are pretty similar to the foiling kite racing that I’ve done. I’m just here trying this out, but the current plans to turn the Nacra into a foiling class are pretty appealing to me.”

Jorge Zarif (BRA), the defending champion in the Finn, is determined to hold on to his title. He scored a second and a first in today’s two race and, counting four points, leads the regatta by three points over Alican Kanyar, of Turkey, and Ben Cornish, of Great Britain. Luke Muller is the top American sailor, in sixth, with 20 points.

It wasn’t a great day for Martina Soffiati Grael and Kahena Kunze, of Brazil. But a second and a ninth, which is now their discard, was more than good enough to keep the pair in the lead of the 49erFX class. Standing on seven points, they have a six-point advantage over Victoria Travascio and Marina Branz of Argentina. Ragna and Maia Agerup (NOR) are third.

After opening the regatta with a 17th, Great Britain’s Dylan Fletcher-Scott and Stuart Bithell have rattled off four top-four finishes and now have a four-point lead over Yago and Klaus Lange of Argentina in the 49er. In third are Carl Sylvan and Marcus Anjemark (SWE).

It’s very tight at the top of the Laser with Jean Baptiste Bernaz (FRA) and Karl Martin Rammo (EST) tied for first with 12 points apiece. Nick Thompson, of Great Britain, is third with 15 points.

@Jesus Renedo / Sailing Energy / World Sailing

Evi Van Acker (BEL) put on a clinic for the Laser Radial fleet, winning both of today’s races. She’s the overall leader, after four races, with four points. Vasileia Karachaliou (GRE) is second with seven points. Erika Reineke, of the United States, had a strong day to surge into third, with 19 points. Behind her are five boats within six points of the podium.

Kiran Badloe (NED) continued his consistently excellent performance in the Men’s RS:X with a pair of second-place finishes and a first. He has eight points. Daniele Beneditti (ITA) is second with 15 points while Louis Giard (FRA) is third with 16.

Yunxiu Lu (CHN) was nearly untouchable today with a 2-1-2. She has 12 points, but has opened up an 11-point lead over second place Isobel Hamliton (GBR). Hei Man H V Chan (HKG) is in third, two points further back.

Pangiotis Mantis and Pavlos Kagialis (GRE) finished second and then first in today’s races in the Men’s 470 fleet, and have moved into the lead. Mathias Schmid and Lukas Mähr (AUT) are in second, just a point behind.

In the Women’s 470 fleet, three teams are bunched at the top of the leaderboard within one point of one another. The Dutch team of Afrodite Zegers and Annaloes Van Veen are first with Bàrbara Cornudella Ravetllat and Sara López Ravetllat (ESP) tied on points with Sophie Weguelin and Eilidh McIntyre (GBR).

Racing continues tomorrow from Coconut Grove at 11 a.m. The Medal Races will be held on Saturday and Sunday starting at noon.

RESULTS / ENTRIES
A full list of sailors registered to sail in Miami is available to view here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/entries?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa
Results will be available from Tuesday 24 January via the Manage2Sail results centre here – http://manage2sail.com/en-US/eventonly/f61c409e-4fad-49a6-baa6-f9287b804645/style/worldcup#!/results?classId=e2d355cc-1d5b-4dfb-b6b9-58c9d28c0cfa

TRACKING
Live tracking and competitor’s analytics will be available via SAP Sailing Analytics throughout the event here – https://swc2017-miami.sapsailing.com/gwt/Home.html#/event/:eventId=b82f9012-47d8-4e9e-b3b2-a690c1db0fe3

PRESS RELEASES
World Sailing will be releasing international press releases after racing throughout the duration of World Cup Miami. All the latest news and reports will be available to read here – http://www.sailing.org/worldcup/news/index.php

TELEVISION
Medal Races on Saturday 28 and Sunday 29 January will be streamed live on World Sailing’s Facebook and YouTube Channel.

SOCIAL MEDIA
Follow the event on World Sailing’s social networks and get involved in the conversation using #SWCMiami17
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/SailingWCMiami/
Instagram – https://instagram.com/isafworldsailing/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/SailingWCMiami or https://twitter.com/worldsailing
Snapchat – Follow our Story on Snapchat, search for worldsailing

SAP Deep Dive, 49er, Race 3: Short is Sweet

It’s tempting to think that because the 49er accelerates so quickly that the key to success on a puffy day is all about sailing in the best wind. Find the dark patches of water and send it.

However, a deep dive inside Race 3, using SAP’s Sailing Analytics, shows that one traditional tenet of the sport remains a constant even in the faster boats: The best path around the course is almost always the shortest.

The top five finishers in the race sailed an average distance of 8,787 meters while the bottom five sailed an average of 9,504, an increase of 7.5 percent.

The solution to the first leg of the race was to bang the right corner. The Belgian team of Levi Slap and Joachim D’Hondt (orange track) rounded the first mark in the lead, trailed closely by Fred Strammer and Trevor Burd (red track), of the United States. Both boats started near the pin, got quickly on to port tack and one-tacked the beat. The British team of Dylan Fletcher-Scott and Stuart Bithell (lime green track), fresh off a win in Race 2, hit the left corner, found themselves on the outside of a right shift, and ended up sailing nearly 200 meters more than the lead boats, 2636 meters verses 2445 meters, on Leg 1. They rounded 14th.

From that point on, for Strammer and Burd, it was a case of the rich getting richer. They executed a jibe set at the first mark and moved quickly into the lead, where they remained for the duration of the race.

The big comebacks of Race 3 came on the third leg from American crew of David Liebenberg and Ian MacDiarmid and Fletcher-Scott/Bithell, which rounded the first windward mark in 18th and 14th and the leeward gate in ninth and 10th, respectively.


This beat was a little more nuanced; teams that sailed relatively similar paths to the windward mark saw very different results. But the teams that did the best again sailed the least amount of distance.

Liebenberg and MacDiarmid  (light orange) sailed 2,184 meters, Fletcher-Scott/Bithell, 2202. Strammer/Burd, 2257. Slap and D’Hondt, who went from second at the leeward mark—a position that should’ve enabled them to sail their own race—to 11th, sailed 2,530 meters, nearly a third of a kilometer more than the shortest solution to the leg.

Of course, it’s easy to dissect a race in hindsight and given the intense analysis possible with SAP’s analytics. In real time, while skimming across the water at 10 to 15 knots and hanging from a trapeze wire, it’s infinitely more difficult. And in a future race, it’s just as likely that the roles may be reversed, with Slap and D’Hondt executing the comeback, or leading at the first mark and never looking back. If predicting the breeze was easy, everyone would be doing it correctly. But the Deep Dive does further reinforce a lesson that is taught in Racing 101 and repeated often no matter what class or style of boat being sailed: when in doubt, keep the bow pointed as close to the mark as possible.

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